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The Formative Feedback Project is a collaborative curation of best practices in educational strategies, ideas, resources. Specializing in student ownership, engagement, feedback loops and collaborative, effective feedback.

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Start Here: Culture of Practice

Taylor Meredith

The first of the "Start Here" series - Classroom Management - can be found here. In this series I talk about how to start a practice and suggest a few possible next steps.

What is a culture of practice?

Culture is something that is developed within a community of learners. A culture of practice is one that celebrates mistakes, learning through trying, feedback, and failure. How do you develop a culture of practice?

  1. Be a learner. We don’t know everything and we shouldn’t know everything. One of the first steps you can take to developing a culture of practice is to model authentic learning - not knowing. Admit when you are not sure of an answer or fact. Share things that you want to learn more about. Point out when someone says something you never thought of or that made you change your mind or think something new.

  2. Call your shots. Did you make a mistake? Bring attention to it. Did you do something wrong? Share it and celebrate it. Tell people when you are trying new, wild ideas - even if they might not work. Fail. Notice and celebrate when others do the same.  

  3. Ask for feedback. The first step to starting authentic feedback loops is asking for feedback yourself. More on this here, here and here.

  4. Set meaningful goals. Establishing a culture of practice doesn’t mean you celebrate when a student finally gets a 100%. Set meaningful goals with your students. They can be data-driven but there should be real life context and purpose in each goal.

  5. Have fun. Failure doesn’t seem so bad when you have someone to celebrate with.

Next Steps:

A couple of great podcasts:

 

 

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